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toastkid



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"Peculiar memories of Thomas Penman", by Bruce Robinson (nm)

Posted by ollie on December 4, 2007, 8:09 am, in reply to "your most inspiring books"

****************************************

Re: your most inspiring books

Posted by Peter Cleall on December 4, 2007, 9:52 am, in reply to "your most inspiring books"
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I can highly recommed The Shock Doctrine by Naomi Klein - un-putdownable!



*****************************************

"Understanding Power - The Indispensable Chomsky"

Posted by Stian on December 4, 2007, 11:16 am, in reply to "your most inspiring books"
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This book radically changed my life and got me started in world politics - which lead med to Media Lens - which led me to Buddhism...I recommend it to anyone not into "leftist" politics or Chomsky.

Stian


********************************************

And one from me

Mark Kurlansky

Non-violence. The history of a dangerous idea

Does what it says on the cover.
Well written. read it in a day.
Tue Dec 04, 2007 1:32 pm
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toastkid



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Pasted from message board some more DC picks


Re: your most inspiring books

Posted by The Editors on December 4, 2007, 3:03 pm, in reply to "your most inspiring books"
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Good idea, and thanks to dan for the forum archive for these. Here are a few of mine.

Robert Tressell's 'The Ragged Troused Philanthropists', read as an impressionable young teenager. ‘A Search for Scotland’ by R. F. Mackenzie, a progressive school teacher who transformed the lives of many children. Several books by Fritjof Capra and E. F. Schumacher were quite influential early on for me - in particular, 'The Turning Point' and 'Small is Beautiful', respectively. Same goes for Richard Douthwaite: 'The Growth Illusion' and 'Short Circuit'. 'Slow Reckoning' by Tom Athanasiou and 'The End of Nature' by Bill McKibben. Susan George's 'The Lugano Report' was a big inspiration when I was writing 'Private Planet.'

Reading 'The Compassionate Revolution' by David Edwards, just after it was published in 1998, made me determined to track him down. Thankfully, he didn't dismiss me as a nutter but instead invited me to his local pub.

Other influential books include pretty much anything and everything by Noam Chomsky, Mark Curtis, Erich Fromm, Ed Herman, John Pilger and Howard Zinn (often thanks to DE for highlighting them, often literally!). Pilger's 'Hidden Agendas' was a real find for me - I devoured that one. Discovering Jeff Schmidt's 'Disciplined Minds' was crucial too. 'Taking the Risk out of Democracy' by Alex Carey is an important book. And 'Homage to Catalonia' by George Orwell is a worthy classic.

One of my favourite books in recent years is 'Happiness' by Matthieu Ricard. I also recommend 'Field notes on the compassionate life' by Marc Ian Barasch. Inspiring works of fiction include 'In dubious battle' by John Steinbeck, 'You have to be careful in the land of the free' by James Kelman, 'The monkey wrench gang' by Edward Abbey and pretty much everything by Alasdair Gray, especially 'Lanark'. Loads of other books I could mention but I'd better stop here.

DC





R. F. Mackenzie's 'A Search for Scotland'

Posted by The Editors on December 4, 2007, 3:14 pm, in reply to "Re: your most inspiring books"
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‘A Search for Scotland’ (1989) by R. F. Mackenzie

Scots forever tell each other, and anyone else who will listen, that we have the best education system in the world. R. F. Mackenzie (1910-1987) disagreed but perhaps did more than anyone else to demonstrate what was possible. He wrote ‘A Search for Scotland’ after a long teaching career in which he upset many in the higher echelons of Scottish education. But he transformed the lives of generations of schoolchildren, many from deprived backgrounds.

The historian T. C. Smout described Mackenzie as “a teacher of progressive freedoms. In a world that worships the golden calf of economic growth, he was sceptical of the happiness it could bring.”

Mackenzie wrote several books about his attempts to liberalise Scottish education, among them ‘A Question of Living’ and ‘Escape from the Classroom’. But his final book is his masterpiece and still as vital today as it ever was. The book is no mere travelogue. Critic Allan Massie wrote accurately that its “true subject is the state of modern civilization.”


May 2, 2006. Written for Glasgow University Magazine.
Tue Dec 04, 2007 6:02 pm
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Re: The Ghandi Award and moments of epiphany

Posted by Tim on December 4, 2007, 4:52 pm, in reply to "The Ghandi Award and moments of epiphany"
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Shortly after September 11th i joined a book club in Wisconsin, where i was living at that time, and our first book, chosen by a genius, was "Collateral Language" edited by John Collins & Ross Glover... from that moment on my eyes have been wide open.

Keep up your invaluable work fellas.

Tim
Tue Dec 04, 2007 6:19 pm
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The Compassionate Revolution

Posted by Grand Inquisitor on December 4, 2007, 6:35 pm, in reply to "Re: your most inspiring books"
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The one and only review of The Compassionate Revolution, even though it sounds like a plant by the Book Publisher , on Amazon.com, is this:

------------------
'If, like this particular reviewer, you grew up in the West and have come to take for granted a competitive capitalist culture where the mantra of "survival of the fittest" reigns supreme, David Edwards' insightful synthesis of radical political dissent and Eastern philosophy may come as something of a revelation.

Edwards wastes little time in casting seeds of doubt on the vain pursuit of personal wealth and happiness at the expense of others as practised in Western culture, condemning the "institutionalised subordination of people and planet to corporate profit" and "an economic system reducing humans and animals to the status of industrial fodder". Here the author summarizes the now-familiar critique of the global justice movement: the demolition of democracy epitomized by the corporate takeover of the planet. Edwards ties in this analysis with a razor-sharp dissection of the myths of press freedom, elegantly distilling the extensive writing of such outstanding dissidents and modern historians as Noam Chomsky, Edward Herman, Howard Zinn, John Pilger and Mark Curtis into a very clear and readable summary.

The true power of Edwards' message, however, lies in his detailed analysis of the underlying malaise of a capitalist system that relies on the unholy trinity of greed, hatred and ignorance in order to prevail: the greed for profit at any cost, the hatred and demonizing of anyone or anything that stands in the way of that profit, and the widespread ignorance of the truly dreadful effects of Western corporate "business as usual" on people and planet. More powerful still is the convincing case Edwards makes for applying Buddhist teachings to the ills of our times: "the antidote is awareness [as opposed to ignorance] rooted in compassion...working for the happiness of others is the basis of all happiness."
Wed Dec 05, 2007 12:57 pm
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toastkid



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Thanks. If DE has any new ones I would be glad to know...

Posted by jim l on December 4, 2007, 8:34 pm, in reply to "The Compassionate Revolution"
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That's my Xmas list sorted. Allows me hide away, with a nose in a book, ignoring my relatives until Dr Who comes on...

Thanks to everyone for contributing - inspirational stuff!

Jim L x


**************************************************


BTW: Has anybody read Dharma Bums by Jack Kerouac?

Posted by jim l on December 4, 2007, 9:37 pm, in reply to "Thanks. If DE has any new ones I would be glad to know..."
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..about some hedonistic guys who try Buddhism, but keep falling back into their old ways. This is familiar territory for me.

I still think 'On the Road' is one of my favourites. You can't beat that sense of freedom combined with the flick of the Vs at the establishment.
Wed Dec 05, 2007 12:59 pm
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Reccomendations for books about Race from JK and Lenin copied form the message board.

Posted by lenin on November 5, 2008, 9:57 am, in reply to "Race"

: Have you read 'Strange Fruit' by Kenan Malik?
: It's the best book on race that I've read.

No and, to be frank, given his spurious assessment of Islamophobia, I don't trust him to have a serious analysis of race. I fail to see how anyone who properly understood the genealogy race and racism could flatly deny that there is such a thing as Islamophobia - unfortunately, one of the many failures of the Furedi tendency. The best books that I have read on race are David Roediger's 'Wages of Whiteness' and C Loring Brace's 'Race is a Four Letter Word'. Alden T Vaughan is also very good.
Thu Nov 06, 2008 1:47 pm
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Lenin, a favour to ask

Posted by ollie Email on February 11, 2009, 7:03 pm

Lenin,

I've got to answer the following:-

"In the realm of politics and political ideas, are religious doctrines a challenge to liberalism in particular? Discuss with reference to at least two of the three major case studies explored in this room: (a) the US abortion case study, (b) the French riots case study, and (c) the case of Iran"

Basically, I need to argue that religion poses little or no threat to liberalism, as long as liberals actually adhere to liberal theory on the freedom to pratice religion. I also want to argue that social injustice and economic inequality is the real threat.

I haven't got a copy of your book, but I was wondering if you had any relevant quotes that might help on this. Or, alternatively, can you point me to a post on your blog that could help either?

Of course it's no trouble if you can't help with this (too busy etc)- but I'll be getting a copy of your book when I get paid either way. If you'd prefer to email me, it's ollierobbins@yahoo.com

thanks!
Ollie

Posted by lenin on February 11, 2009, 7:31 pm, in reply to "Lenin, a favour to ask"

I'll e-mail some material to you, but just off the cuff, my reaction would be that liberalism's uneasy relationship to religion points to limitations in liberalism itself. I mean, to take the case of the banlieue riots, the idea that this was all about religion is a purely liberal reading (and a particularly mundane liberal reading at that). In a way, I think the response of liberals such as Christopher Hitchens and Pascal Bruckner was a gargantuan example of projection, in which the dark side of liberalism was imputed to some mythical essence of Islam. I would recommend Joan Wallach Scott's book, The Politics of the Veil for an insight into the way in which French republicanism has been complicit in colonial and racist doctrines that have endured to this date, mainly taking the form of hostility to migrants from the former imperial periphery, and which have become newly regnant in the era of the 'war on terror'.

And a couple of quick references

Posted by lenin on February 11, 2009, 7:40 pm, in reply to "Re: Lenin, a favour to ask"

For some invaluable introductory info, check out:

Joel Beinin and Joe Stork, Political Islam, IB Tauris, 1997

Sami Zubaida, Islam, The People and the State, IB Tauris, 2001

Nazih Aybi, Political Islam: Religion and Politics in the Arab World, Routledge, 1991

Also, let's not forget that this particular relationship between liberalism and Islam has, as one of its bases, the Aryanism of empire. So, for an admittedly obscure but still useful discussion, see:

Tony Ballantyne, Oriantalism and Race, Palgrave Macmillan, 2002

Also, get hold of a copy of Hegel's Philosophy of History for some interesting tuition on liberal philosophy and Islam. It would be unfair to say that Hegel was just a liberal. He was a fascinating critic of liberalism, in many ways. But on empire he swallowed the imperial story wholesale.

Re: And a couple of quick references

Posted by lenin on February 11, 2009, 8:06 pm, in reply to "Re: And a couple of quick references"

: great stuff- thanks. Trouble is, I'd have to
: buy and read these books by sunday.
: Interesting for further reading though.

No need to buy, I'd just ensure they're in your library: some of them are bound to be. Then I'd use the index to check for topics that you need to read and scan through for useful quotables or stats, etc. The Beinin & Stork volume, for example, has loads of useful essays on Islam and Democracy, the Iranian Revolution, Liberal Islam, Islam and Feminism, etc etc. I can probably forward some articles from scholarly journals that you can use too.
Thu Feb 12, 2009 1:42 am
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Re: Foucault again (just for some handy relativism) nom

Posted by lenin on February 12, 2009, 8:45 am, in reply to "Re: Foucault again (just for some handy relativism) nom "

: Just out of curiosity, isn't it a commonplace
: these days that liberalism is fascism on its
: day off?

Given that fascism is explicitly anti-liberal, despises its individualism, rationalism, enlightenment, etc., this assertion would demand some elaborate supporting argument. Perhaps it would be better to view it in terms of the tendency for the ideals of liberalism to transmute into their opposites. After all, liberalism emerged as part of the same historical complex as capitalism, colonialism, race 'science', slavery, etc. As such, it has been implicated in the development of forms of tyranny that both negated its essential premises and contributed to the development of fascism. Enzo Traverso is very good on this - see his The Origins of Nazi Violence.
Thu Feb 12, 2009 10:37 am
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book recommendations from Keith-264 and Dr Gideon Polya

Dear Doc

Posted by Keith-264 [User Info] [Email User] on August 10, 2009, 11:09 am, in reply to "Oz Truthful Journalist Reuben Brand: post-invasion Iraqi violent deaths "1.2 million and counting" "

Being a history man I'm not surprised about 'Western' crimes or that the Johnny-come-lateleys Hitler and Stalin are used as moral loss leaders. If you turn Hitler's crimes right for about 90 degrees what do you get? The history of Europe's exploitation of the southern hemisphere for the last 500 years, that's what. Mark Mazower makes no bones about it which makes a change but I wonder if you're familiar with 'The First World War: An Agrarian Interpretation' by Avner Offer?


Posted by Dr Gideon Polya [User Info] [Email User] on August 10, 2009, 3:47 pm, in reply to "Dear Doc"

Thanks for the reference Keith - I will look it up. In his brilliant book on the basis for Western colonialism "Exterminate all the Brutes" , Sven Lindqvist makes it clear that the Nazi atrocities in Eastern Europe were a lebensraum-driven German equivalent of what the Western colonialists had been doing in the Americas, Africa, Asia, Australasia and the Pacific.
Mon Aug 10, 2009 10:41 pm
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Re: New Statesman: Bias and the Beeb
Posted by RMS on August 27, 2009, 2:14 pm, in reply to "New Statesman: Bias and the Beeb"

Thanks for posting this..but the author ought to read "The British State" by James Harvey and Katherine Hood (1959) Which devotes a brilliant chapter on the inner workings of the BBC and ITN exposing the in built bias of these public service broadcasters since their inception. They give a summary of attitudes and examples of the anti-working class, anti-socialist bias that is deep within the ethos of both organisations (joined now by skynews) For example a report from the national Council of Civil Liberties observed
"The BBC has been accustomed for many years to abrogate to itself the right, in normal times, to censor the expression of views by outside speakers to the microphone...disquieting information is received from time to time that certain well-known public figures are blacklisted" NCCL 1955.
The BBC is fundamentaly part of the state machine, its news broadcasting "has all the function of slanting news in an anti-socialist direction, all the tricks for distorting the truth and conditioning peoples minds"...(The BS 1959)
Mehdi Hasan is saying nothing new, he omits the BBC's long standing hostility to the socialist left, the trade unions and almost blanket ban on communists since 1926.


--Previous Message--
: The charge that the broadcasting corporation
: is left-wing has been repeated so often that
: it goes almost unchallenged. If anything,
: Mehdi Hasan argues, it is a bastion of
: conservatism.
:
: http://www.newstatesman.com/uk-politics/2009/08/bbc-wing-bias-corporation
:
Sat Aug 29, 2009 12:23 pm
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Re: Can NL be democracised?

Posted by Alex Doherty [User Info] on October 31, 2009, 8:27 am, in reply to "Can NL be democracised?"

Serious efforts to democratise the Labour party were made by New left elements within the party during the mid 70's and early 80's - eventually they were beaten back by the centre and right wing of the party (people who today would be considered to be little better than communists by the NL leadership) - the chances of making NL into a democratic force for good is now negligible. Leo Panitch and Colin Leys document the efforts of the Labour New Left in 'The End of Parliamentary Socialism" - it's an excellent read:
Mon Nov 02, 2009 9:07 am
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Copied from message board.


"Posted by MikeD on November 7, 2009, 2:25 pm, in reply to "Chris Harman RIP"

Tragic indeed.People's History is a brilliant work I read it recently and got following offer from Amazon re his latest ( last) book which I think applies to all......."

".....A People's History of the World: From the Stone Age to the New Millennium by Chris Harman"... [+] ......"Zombie Capitalism by Chris Harman."

Zombie Capitalism
Chris Harman"


"Posted by JK [User Info] on November 7, 2009, 3:11 pm, in reply to "Re: Chris Harman RIP - his Zombie Capitalism just published"

Harman's great little book, 'How Marxism Works', is the main reason I became a Socialist."
Sat Nov 07, 2009 6:05 pm
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toastkid



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Peter Cleal recommended the ragged trousered philanthropist.

http://www.medialens.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=3032&start=0&postdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=
Sat Nov 07, 2009 8:25 pm
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Re: A Certain Ratio

Posted by Ged Travers [User Info] [Email User] on November 19, 2009, 11:41 am, in reply to "Re: A Certain Ratio"

"...........................................................
I've just re-read Trotsky's 1905 and this whole internet lark minds me of ch. 13 'Storming the Censorship Bastilles' in a cyberspace abstract sense, of course. Wherein Trotsky details the lengths to which the Petersburgh Soviet were driven to publish Izvestia. With the tacit compliance of management and the wholehearted support of the print workers."
Thu Nov 19, 2009 2:01 pm
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Re: Response to latest Cogitation

Posted by Alex Doherty [User Info] on March 15, 2010, 2:21 pm, in reply to "Response to latest Cogitation"

I've just finished a very interesting book on climate change by Clive Hamilton called 'Requiem for a species'. In it he argues that long term human survival may depend upon what he calls a "metapersonal self-construal" - a way of being where the strict division between self and others and self and nature is far more fluid. I do get the feeling that such notions and the ideas that are covered in the cogitatons are becoming a bit less alien on the left these days.
Mon Mar 15, 2010 9:33 pm
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"Posted by Alex Doherty [User Info] on April 20, 2010, 2:17 pm, in reply to "Chris Hedges on "Empire of Illusion""


The book of the same name is an excellent read:

http://www.amazon.com/Empire-Illusion-Chris-Hedge/dp/1568584377"
Tue Apr 20, 2010 8:22 pm
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copied from message board discussion of the corruption of foreign aid

Posted by pete f [User Info] [Email User] on June 28, 2010, 12:48 pm, in reply to "yes - debt time-bomb economics, Miachael Hudson also explains same strategy in Eastern Europe (nm)"

Grip of Death by Michael Rowbotham

Over 30,000 children a day die of starvation thanks to capitalist economic policies, or around 15 million a year:

http://www.starvation.net/
http://library.thinkquest.org/C002291/high/present/stats.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starvation

#

Every year 15 million children die of hunger
#

For the price of one missile, a school full of hungry children could eat lunch every day for 5 years
#

Throughout the 1990's more than 100 million children will die from illness and starvation. Those 100 million deaths could be prevented for the price of ten Stealth bombers, or what the world spends on its military in two days!
Wed Jun 30, 2010 2:49 pm
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from the web pages of the book/site Amoral America

some recommended reading

http://www.amoralamerica.info/pb/wp_68774a9f/wp_68774a9f.html
Wed Jun 30, 2010 4:22 pm
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Copied from message board thread on uk imperialism and deference to the US post 1939

"Posted by Hidari [User Info] on July 3, 2010, 1:51 pm, in reply to "Re: Poor article by Fisk in the Independent"

'Britain's ruling class had far more of its money invested in the USA by 1939 and vice versa. '

I haven't read it, but apparently this point is made in Cain and Hoopkins' British Imperialism 1688-2000."

and in reply

"Posted by Keith-264 [User Info] [Email User] on July 3, 2010, 6:42 pm, in reply to "Re: Poor article by Fisk in the Independent"

Thanks, you might like a look at http://www.amazon.co.uk/Replenishing-Earth-Settler-Revolution-Angloworld/dp/0199297274/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1278178791&sr=1-1

Which I'll get round to after I've dragged my way through http://www.amazon.co.uk/Empires-Barbarians-Migration-Development-Europe/dp/0330492551/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1278178887&sr=1-1

an informative but dreadfully written read. "
Sun Jul 04, 2010 5:52 pm
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Copied from message board

"Posted by Alex Doherty [User Info] on July 6, 2010, 10:26 am, in reply to "Disconnection from Nature"


A good book on this topic:

http://www.amazon.com/Ecopsychology-Restoring-Earth-Healing-Mind/dp/0871564068 "
Tue Jul 06, 2010 7:46 pm
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Copied from a discussion regarding the possible delusion of Richard Dawkins and the nature of thoughts.

Posted by Chris E [User Info] [Email User] on August 17, 2010, 6:55 pm, in reply to "Re: "The Dawkins Delusion""

This is the text I would most recommend actually:

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=OVGna4ZEpWwC&lpg=PP1&dq=mind%20in%20life%20thompson&pg=PP1#v=onepage&q&f=falses

[Mind in Life by Evan Thompson]
Wed Aug 18, 2010 1:02 am
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"Can you recommend any reading material that undermines the official line regarding WW2
Posted by Anton on November 15, 2010, 1:59 am, in reply to "Re: Shouldn't we remember British servicemen?"

I'm afraid I'm not that clued up on it either- I only know that:
1. Churchill knew about Auschwitz years before 1945 and did nothing and
2. that the Soviets played an essential role in beating Nazi Germany and suffered huge losses in the process."

Reply

"Gabriel Kolko's "Politics of War" makes it all very clear
Posted by emersberger on November 15, 2010, 3:44 am, in reply to "Can you recommend any reading material that undermines the official line regarding WW2"

also shed s considerable light on why the Marshall Plan was crucial to saving Capitalism in Europe.

"

Reply

"Re: Can you recommend any reading material that undermines the official line regarding WW2
Posted by Sherwoodian on November 15, 2010, 5:06 am, in reply to "Can you recommend any reading material that undermines the official line regarding WW2"

Patrick Buchanan´s "Hitler, Churchill and the Unnecessary War" is a good review of the origins of WW 1 and 2, and blows away many myths.
"
Reply

"Re: Has anyone read Nicholson Baker's 'Human Smoke'?
Posted by Anton on November 15, 2010, 8:15 am, in reply to "Can you recommend any reading material that undermines the official line regarding WW2"

I found it on the internet- if it is factually sound then it completely demolishes Churchill's post-war reputation.

http://www.vnnforum.com/showthread.php?t=68969"

Reply to the last post.

"Posted by The Editors on November 15, 2010, 9:15 am, in reply to "Re: Has anyone read Nicholson Baker's 'Human Smoke'?"

Excellent book; every school should have a copy.

Eds

==

To shore up the case for England’s retaliatory bombing of Germany - despite the fact that no English cities had yet been bombed - Churchill asked the new minister of information, Duff Cooper, to “arrange that discreet reference should be made in the press to the killing of civilians in France and the Low Countries, in the course of German air attacks.” The press should not actually mention retaliation, however, Churchill thought.
Permanent Under-Secretary Cadogan wrote in his diary: “Cabinet this morning decided to start bombing Ruhr. Now the ‘Total War’ begins!”
(p. 182, May 15, 1940)


A British admiral, Lord Somerville, delivered an ultimatum to a squadron of French warships anchored in the port of Mers el Kebir, on the Algerian coast: Join the British navy or scuttle your ships.

[…]

“Admiral Gensour [the French commander] then said, ‘For God’s sake, stop firing. You’re murdering us!’ ” More than a thousand French soldiers died. It was July 3, 1940.
In the House of Commons, Churchill gave a rousing speech about the destruction of the French fleet. “When he finished, the decorum of the Parliament vanished,” wrote General Raymond Lee, who was watching from the Distinguished Strangers Gallery. “All were on their feet, shouting, cheering and waving order papers and handkerchiefs like mad.”

Reply

"Re: Can you recommend any reading material that undermines the official line regarding WW2
Posted by Aidan on November 15, 2010, 8:15 am, in reply to "Can you recommend any reading material that undermines the official line regarding WW2"


World War Two: Lessons and Warnings
By Nick Beams

"According to the prevailing legends, the war in Europe began when Britain, after trying to appease Nazi Germany, finally realized with the invasion of Poland in September 1939, that a stand had to be taken. From then on, the war was a struggle of democracy against fascist aggression. Great Britain, standing alone after the defeat of France in May 1940, and until the entry of the US in December 1941, confronted the menace of Nazism, as the war-time prime minister Winston Churchill rallied the small island nation in its “finest hour”.

The fact that when the war began, Great Britain stood at the head of the largest empire the world has ever seen, encompassing a quarter of the earth’s surface, is conveniently left out of this story. The myth is further embellished regarding the role of Churchill. With the failure of the policy of appeasement, we are led to believe, Churchill, an ardent defender of democracy and opponent of Nazism and fascism, was called to office from the political wilderness to take charge of Britain in her hour of need.

Like all historical legends this one is sustained because it serves contemporary political objectives..."

http://www.wsws.org/articles/2009/nov2009/nbww-n18.shtml


"
and a further thread covering the difference between Russian and Western allied efforts in WWII

http://medialens.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=3139&start=0&postdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=
Mon Nov 15, 2010 1:33 pm
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"Re: Greenwald on "the same undifferentiated class" of media and political figures
Posted by Chris Shaw on December 5, 2010, 10:22 am, in reply to "Greenwald on "the same undifferentiated class" of media and political figures"

Spot on. The Book 'Barbarians at the Gate' reveals the seamless connections between film/tv stars, politics, sports stars and business. At the top, this small clique are all one happy family, working together to keep the 'spectacle' on the road, and their private jets in the air.
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Sun Dec 05, 2010 11:20 pm
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toastkid



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Re: Italian activist murdered in Gaza
Posted by Peter on April 15, 2011, 12:56 pm, in reply to "Italian activist murdered in Gaza"

A great shame.

The activist murdered, Vittorio Arrigon, features heavily in Sharyn Lock's book 'Gaza: Beneath The Bombs', under his nickname Vik.

Lock was a member of the ISM who volunteered with the Palestinian Red Crescent during Operation Cast Lead. The book is a first hand account of the situation on the ground in those few weeks, and is in turn horrifying, moving, funny (in a sort of gallows humour type way), and always informative. It gives a real sense of the vicious brutality of the IDF assault, and the struggles and defiance of Gazans themselves.

So if you want an idea of the selfless work Vittorio Arrigon and the other ISM activists, Palestinian and non-Palestinian alike, were and are engaged in the OPTs, this book is well worth picking up.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gaza-Beneath-Bombs-Sharyn-Lock/dp/074533024X
Sat Apr 16, 2011 12:19 pm
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toastkid



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"Thanks both!
Posted by Stevo!! on July 11, 2011, 3:01 pm, in reply to "Re: Stevo!!, Pete: I luvya! Keep ferreting and analysing, lads, and posting your findings here. Always -"

Pete f seems to have more idea of what he's talking about than I do, though.

And, I assure you, that is not false modesty on my part.

Cutting through the crap of economic affairs is greatly helped by books such as "The Grip of Death", by Michael Rowbotham, a book that stands much conventional economic theory completely on its head.

Essential reading for anyone interested in this subject, despite being 13 years old."
Mon Jul 11, 2011 9:15 pm
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