Forum

profile |  register |  members |  groups |  faq |  search  login

Recommended reading.
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Media Lens Forum Index -> Video, News, Books, Websites
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
toastkid



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 393

Post Post subject: Recommended reading. Reply with quote

Mark wanted some book recommendations. Please feel free to contribute non fiction on this thread.

Fiction recommendations can be posted here


Recommendations for childrens books (fiction or non fiction) can be posted here

Last edited by toastkid on Tue Sep 26, 2006 7:31 pm; edited 4 times in total
Fri Mar 03, 2006 12:49 am
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
toastkid



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 393

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

DE's recommendations from message board
"Two books which are so brilliant you underline almost everything: Sharon Beder's Global Spin and Mark Curtis's The Ambiguities of Power (beg or borrow that one, it's out of print - a scandal!). Those are must-reads.

Howard Zinn's The Zinn Reader is a treasure - packed full of brilliant, moving essays. Chomsky's lesser-known On Power And Ideology - tremendous. If you want to bury yourself out of sight in Chomsky the huge Understanding Power (it's backed up by thousands of web-based references - an incredible resource). I think his latest, Hegemony or Survival, is one of his very best. Herman's the Real Terror Network - like another world from the mainstream version of events. Joel Bakan's The Corporation - vital, much better than the film (IMO). For a deep insight into the power of generosity and compassion - Aryasura's The Marvelous Companion (along with Manufacturing Consent the most important influence on the Media Lens project). Erich Fromm's The Sane Society - incredibly insightful. Helena Norberg-Hodge's Ancient Futures reveals the truth of our 'progress' and 'development' by charting their devastating impact on the Ladakhi culture of Northern India. To gain an insight into the hideous impact of modern education - John Taylor Gatto's Dumbing Us Down.

Elizabeth Fones-Wolf's Selling Free Enterprise. It's not the most thrilling read but it tells you exactly what the American people have been up against. It reads almost like science fiction but it's all real - quite amazing (and all but unknown in the UK)".


Last edited by toastkid on Fri Mar 03, 2006 12:45 pm; edited 2 times in total
Fri Mar 03, 2006 1:11 am
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
toastkid



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 393

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

'Commodify your Dissent' by Thomas Frank.
Fri Mar 03, 2006 1:15 am
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
themaras



Joined: 21 Jan 2004
Posts: 12
Location: Oxford, UK

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

Two favourites:

Century of War: Politics, Conflict, and Society Since 1914
Gabriel Kolko
New Press
1995
ISBN: 1565841921




Athens on Trial. The Anti-democratic Tradition in Western Thought.
Jennifer Tolbert Roberts
Princeton: Princeton University Press
1994.
ISBN 0691056978
Fri Mar 03, 2006 12:12 pm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Will



Joined: 03 Mar 2006
Posts: 1

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

In terms of non-fiction books, the ones that I can remember that made an impression, that I would enthusiastically recommend and are relevant to this forum are as follows:

Noam Chomksy:Hegemony or Survival, Rogue States and Power & Terror

John Pilger: Heroes,Distant Voices, Tell Me No Lies and The Secret Rulers of the World

Robert Fisk: Pity the Nation

David Hirst: The Gun and the Olive Branch

Michael Klare: Blood for Oil:The Dangers and Consequences of America's Growing Petroleum Dependency

John Gary: Straw Dogs:Notes on Humans and Other Animals & Al Queda:What it means to be Modern

Sven Lindqvist: A History of Bombing ( this is an essential read)

Paul Kilngsworth: One No, Many Yeses

Noreena Hertz:The Silent Takeover: Global Capitalism and the Death of Democracy

Greg Palast: The Best Democracy Money Can Buy

Eric Schlosser: Fast Food Nation

William Blum: Rogue State

Gore Vidal: Perpetual War for Perpetual Peace & The Bush/Cheney Junta

Mark Curtis: Web of Deceit and Britain's Secret Human Rights Abuses

Avi Shlaim: The Iron Wall-Israel & the Arabs

Eric Hobsbawm: A History of the 20th Century and Interesting Times

Philip Knightly:The First Casualty

Norman Finkelstein: The Holocaust Industry-Reflections on the Exploitation of Jewish Suffering

Ed Moloney: A Secret History of the IRA

Edward Said: The End of the Peace Process

Max Hastings: Going to the Wars

John Simpson: A Mad World my Masters-Tales from a travellers Life

Philip Bobbit: The Shield of Achilles: War, Peace and the Course of History

Andrew Gowers: Arafat: The Biography

Stephen Walker: Shockwave;The Bombing of Hiroshima

Simon Sebag Montefiore: The Court of the Red Tsar

Ian Kershaw: Hitler-Hubris 1936-1945

George Orwell: Collected Essays

Seamus Milne: The Secret War against the Miners

Bob Woodward: Plan of Attack & The Secret Wars of the CIA

Richard Clarke: Against All Enemies

Nelson Mandela: The Long walk to Freedom

George Galloway: I'm not the only one

Tony Benn: Free Radical: New Century Essays

Andruhati Roy: The Algebra of Infinite Justice

Richard Davenport-Hines:The Pursuit of Oblivion: A Global History of Narcotics
Fri Mar 03, 2006 2:01 pm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
toastkid



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 393

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

An earlier reading thread (non-fiction and fiction)

http://www.medialens.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=434


Last edited by toastkid on Fri Aug 25, 2006 3:26 pm; edited 1 time in total
Sun Mar 05, 2006 1:05 am
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
toastkid



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 393

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

Mark recommends.

A book recommendation: The Philosopher's Diet - How to lose weight and change the world. By Richard Watson.

Now, I know it may sound stupid. Or irrelevant to political board posters -- but it's neither. One of the reviewers at amazon called it a 'little gem' and I agree. And I dont recommend many books to people, Believe me.

This book is...hard to describe...its like what a Diet book would be like if it were written by David Edwards. Think of it that way.

I dont have a weight problem so I dont really know why I started skimming this book the other day, but I did -- anyway its one of the best books I've read this year.

Here's one quote just to give you a taste of the book. (I probably shouldnt use this quote because it will make the author sound like a boring moralizer. The book is actually funny and thought-provoking...and mixed with a healthy dose of anti-agribusiness and anti-corporate moralizing) :

"...the problem is that nowhere in the world are business, government and industry set up to distribute food equally. None of the world's leaders today could do it. It would take a revolution to change the system. Should you try to do something about it? Yes. This is a revolution I think we should all support. If anything is immoral, surely not trying to change a system of food production and distribution in which YOU are overfed while millions of others are starving is immoral. You can stop supporting the extravagances of the processed-food industries. You can eat less meat or even become a vegetarian. (I dont want to get off on this tangent but commercial beef, pork, lamb and poultry are so full of steroids, hormones and antibiotics that even some meat producers say we should think twice about eating them)..."
===========

Here's another quote fwiw: "...we might as well start out by seeing if you can gain control of your eating behavior. You want to take it off and keep it off. Fine. But if you can do that the world had better watch out because if you can succeed in this struggle there are other difficult things you can do if you put your mind to it. Those other things may go against the grain of government , business and industry. If you are serious about this you are a troublemaker. Philosphers always make trouble. The powers-that-be dislike troublemakers. Lets get on with it? Ok..."

One more quote:

"...Now can I talk about carrots? ...never peel a carrot."

later,
mark


(Under a dollar for used copies at Amazon)
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1567920845/ref=ord_cart_shr/102-6409177-5665737?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance&n=283155
Wed May 10, 2006 7:51 am
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
toastkid



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 393

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

JK's reply.

" Hey cheers for this Mark. I'll have a look at it for sure. One of the best books I've reads this year is The Philosopher at the End of the Universe by Mark Rowlands."
Wed May 10, 2006 7:54 am
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
toastkid



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 393

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

Dav's recommendation.

I guess the title speaks for itself.


The Origins and Organisation of British Propaganda in Ireland 1920
Brian P Murphy
Fri Aug 25, 2006 3:20 pm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
toastkid



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 393

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

"Defying Hitler" by Sebastian Haffner

A newly discovered memoir by a German classified as "Aryan" describes the insidious early spread of Nazism and how hard it was to resist.

Mentioned by John Monro
Fri Aug 25, 2006 6:21 pm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
toastkid



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 393

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

Recommended by Noam Chomsky here as a review of how the neo conservatives gained control of the republican movement.

Off Center: The Republican Revolution and the Erosion of American Democracy - Jacob S. Hacker and Paul Pierson
Mon Aug 28, 2006 11:22 am
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
toastkid



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 393

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

JK recommends this (pasted from the message board)


"A little expensive but a brilliant read.

Critical Readings: Moral Panics and the Media
Synopsis
First coined by Stanley Cohen in 1972, 'moral panic' is a key term in media studies, used to refer to sudden eruptions of indignant concern about social issues. An occurrence of moral panic is characterised by stylized and stereotypical representation by the mass media, and a tendency for those in power to claim the moral high ground and pronounce judgement. In this important book, Chas Critcher brings together essential readings on moral panics, which he contextualises in the light of moral panic scholarship through an editor's introduction and concise section introductions. The first section discusses moral panic models, and includes contributions on the history and intellectual background of the concept. Differences in thinking between British and American moral panic scholarship are also examined. A second section features important case studies, including AIDS, Satanism, drugs, paedophilia and asylum seekers. This is followed by readings that look at themes such as the importance of language, rhetoric and discourse; the dynamics of media reporting and how it affects public opinion; and the idea of the 'risk society'. Finally, readings critique and debate the use and relevance of moral panic models. "Critical Readings: Moral Panics And The Media" is a valuable resource for students and researchers in media studies, criminology and sociology. It includes essays by: David L. Altheide, Nachman Ben-Yehuda, Joel Best, Theodore Chiricos, John Clarke, Stan Cohen, Chas Critcher, Mary deYoung, Julie Dickinson, Erich Goode, Johanna Habermeier, Stuart Hall, Sean P. Hier, Tony Jefferson, Philip Jenkins, Hans Mathias Kepplinger, Jennifer Kitzinger, Daniel Maier-Katkin, Angela McRobbie, Peter Meylakhs, Suzanne Ost, Bryan Roberts, Liza Schuster, Stephen Stockwell, Kenneth Thompson, Sarah L.Thornton, Sheldon Ungar, Simon Watney, Jeffrey Weeks, Michael Welch, and Paul Williams.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Critical-Readings-Moral-Panics-Media/dp/0335218075/sr=8-3/qid=1159275675/ref=sr_1_3/026-8156551-0310004?ie=UTF8&s=books
"


Felix recommends the original "Moral Panics and Folk Devils by Stanley Cohen"

"Is a great book, which I put off reading for a long time as it seemed a bit forbiddibg-but finished in 2 days when I eventually picked it up. It's his first work and is all about the 'mods and rockers' clashes in the 60s, which is not only historically interesting (especially if you've seen quadraphrenia, but also astonishing regarding the media and police fabrication of the whole phenomenon. I got it because someone recommended it here, so I'm doing the same-order it and enjoy.."
Tue Sep 26, 2006 2:21 pm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
toastkid



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 393

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

Three from the Informationist

"Roland Barthes....Mythologies

a great book, very easy to read and dip into (apart from the appendix on semiotic theory which isnt rocket science but its not exactly catherine cookson either)

its made up of short essays about public spectacles and signs etc. (like a wrestling match, magazine coverage of a royal cruise, films about romans, what wine represents to the french, all sorts of things decoded in an interesting and often funny style)

relevant reading for those interested in media imo. (and good if you are skint as its pretty cheap in paper back form)

cheers

info

(oh and maybe recommend "the revolution of everyday life" by Raoul Vaneigem, some describe it as a more readable situationist text, unlike the more famous "society of the spectacle" by debord which is great too but quite a heavy read, "the revolution of everyday life" is available as a free ebook here... http://library.nothingness.org/articles/SI/en/pub_contents/5
"
Tue Sep 26, 2006 7:27 pm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
toastkid



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 393

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

Ron F recommends

"Bleeding Afghanistan - Washington, Warlords and the Propaganda of Silence

I've just put in an order for this book and thought I'd recommend it here. I'm sure the Ed's won't mind me plugging it, especially as it has a chapter titled "The Propaganda of Silence: Impunity and the Mass Media". You can find out more about the book at the link.

Bleeding Afghanistan - Washington, Warlords and the Propaganda of Silence


The authors, Sonali Kolhatkar and James Ingalls, are the co-directors of the Afghan Women’s Mission, a U.S.-based non-profit organization that works with the Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan (RAWA) and is dedicated to social and political projects in Afghanistan, run by and for Afghan women. All author royalties will be donated to the Afghan Women’s Mission.

Here's the foreword to the book, written by David Barsamian, founder and director of Alternative Radio"
Wed Sep 27, 2006 6:03 pm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
toastkid



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 393

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

Recommended by JK

"Perhaps someone could be kind enough to post this book recommendation in the forum for me
This extraordinary book by Hywel Williams, a historian, journalist and broadcaster, vividly presents the new, post-1979 shape of the British ruling class. Unlike most surveys of Britain, by for example, Anthony Sampson, Will Hutton or Jeremy Paxman, he concludes that there is indeed a ruling class in Britain, though he swaddles this in the misleading phrase `power elites'.

He shows how this class is abandoning Britain and so is not a `British' class any more: "Britain, increasingly, has an elite whose attitudes are `offshore' and disconnected from the business of being British." They "have largely lost any sense of Britain as a national project and are largely disengaged from it."

He depicts the political elite, now more centralised than ever before in the House of Commons. He shows how governments and parliamentary parties all embrace the interests of finance capital. He also examines the professional elites, especially business consultants, IT firms, university vice-chancellors and City lawyers.

But the core of this book, as of the ruling class, is the financial and business elite. Williams shows us "the core competence of the City of London: reckless gambling on the one hand and well-spoken, beautifully suited, sharp practice on the other." He notes, "The rest of London - indeed the rest of Britain - could disappear tomorrow and the City would carry on functioning quite happily."

He shows how globalised capital, with its compulsory free movements of capital and labour, has produced ever greater wealth at one pole of society. In 2002, Britain's richest 5% owned 43% of Britain's total wealth, up from 36% in 1986, and they owned 62% of disposable wealth (i.e. less the value of homes), up from 46% in 1986.

But at the other pole of society, where the rest of us live, globalised capital has produced greater relative poverty. There are now eight million people with debts of more than £10,000, four million of whom owe more than £20,000. British homes are 70% dearer in relation to wages than they were in 2000; the average house costs six times the average income, seven times as much in London and the south-east.

Williams details "the elite's collective crassness, brutality and selfishness". He shows how the rulers "have proved to be the destroyers of the democratic aspiration and effective debate which should lie at the heart of an open society." He sums up, "Britain has allowed its power elites to effect a transformation which amounts to the degradation of an entire country."

The ruling class's pretence that their profit is our good has worn out. Williams has grasped what he calls, "the truth beneath the surface, even a surface as polished, pitiless and remorseless as the one presented to us by our power elites. After all, the more concentrated and extreme a form of power becomes then the more vigorously it digs, eventually, its own grave."
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Britains-Power-Elites-Hywel-Williams/dp/1845291697/sr=8-1/qid=1161368944/ref=sr_1_1/026-7093574-5623619?ie=UTF8&s=books
"
Fri Oct 20, 2006 10:55 pm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
toastkid



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 393

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Andreas

Copied from message board


" "Professional" servility to power is analysed by Jeff Schmidt in his 2000 book "Disciplined Minds" http://disciplinedminds.com/ "
Thu Oct 26, 2006 9:06 am
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
toastkid



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 393

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

David C pasted this at the link below

BOOK REVIEWED-Moral Minds: How Nature Designed Our Universal Sense of Right and Wrong

by Marc D. Hauser

http://www.medialens.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1967&start=0&postdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=
Thu Oct 26, 2006 10:30 pm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
toastkid



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 393

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

Copied from message board
JK recommends
The Country Under My Skin: A Memoir of Love and War (Paperback)
Gioconda Belli



"This book is also worth reading...
From Booklist
*Starred Review* Belli, author of the acclaimed novel The Inhabited Woman (1994), could have simply enjoyed the benefits of upper-class Nicaraguan life as a young wife and mother, but privileged domesticity could not contain her questing spirit. She soon launched a successful advertising career in Managua, found her soul mates among writers and revolutionaries, and became both a celebrated poet and a Sandinista, risking her life in her country's fight for freedom. Belli's dramatic and heroic story is an epic of liberation both personal and communal, and she chronicles her harrowing experiences with magnetic candor and lithe lyricism, sharing her insider's view of the Sandinistas' hard-won, tragically brief victory and the wrenching anguish of their annihilation thanks to Reagan and Bush and the Iran-Contra debacle. Motherhood and love affairs under fire, gun running and media work, poetry prizes and exile, and ceaseless combat against misogyny and despair, Belli's powerfully told story reveals the symbiotic give-and-take of body and soul, art and politics, and altruism and pragmatism that make up the human continuum. A tribute to beauty, valor, and justice, Belli's giving and clarion book is also an antidote to fear and apathy, and a reminder that freedom is always a work in progress.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/product-description/1400032164/ref=dp_proddesc_0/002-8737409-1092042?ie=UTF8&n=283155&s=books"
Wed Nov 08, 2006 8:35 pm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
toastkid



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 393

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

Pasted from message board

"Erich Fromm
Posted by Andrew on January 3, 2007, 2:20 pm, in reply to "Dawkins - Losing his mind"
User logged in as: Barking_Mad

in his book 'Fear of Freedom' provided an interesting analysis of Hitler and the rise of the Nazi's. I know the Ed's love his work and anyone interested should have a read, a truly inspiring book
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Fear-Freedom-Routledge-Classics/dp/0415253888"
Wed Jan 03, 2007 6:44 pm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
toastkid



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 393

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

Copied from message board


"Re: Pinochet's Bloodbath
Posted by Martin on December 19, 2006, 3:40 pm, in reply to "Re: Pinochet's Bloodbath"
User logged in as: Nuevo2

I recommend the book "NATOs secret armies: operation Gladio and terrorism in Western Europe" by Daniele Ganser (Frank Cass, 2005). It demonstrates the same process in Europe between 1945 and 1990 (coups, assasinations, indiscriminate terror). "
Wed Jan 03, 2007 7:03 pm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
toastkid



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 393

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

copied from message board

"The War on Truth by Neil Mackay -- the best book I've read since Gaurdians of Power
Posted by JK on January 8, 2007, 12:34 pm
User logged in as: ashenton

Synopsis
So, you think you know everything there is to know about the invasion of Iraq? Well, think again. In The War on Truth, internationally acclaimed investigative journalist, author and film-maker Neil Mackay exposes what really lay behind the occupation of Iraq as well as the truth about what is happening there today. Mackay draws on his sources within British and American intelligence and four years spent investigating the roots of the war, the invasion and the occupation. In this highly accessible, no-holds-barred polemic, an arsenal of incendiary facts, scoops and exposes are unleashed and delivered with aplomb. This is the book for the 21st-century ?thinking rebel? ? a literary guerilla attack on those in power that takes no prisoners; a savage, satirical and personal take on the violent world we live in. The War on Truth reveals: what the UK?s spies really make of the war and Tony Blair; how Blair could be legally impeached; how the torture of Iraqis was sanctioned at the very highest levels; how the media manipulated the west into support for the war; how the allies used WMD against the people of Iraq; how two secret spying units were set up by the British and Americans to lie to the public about the threat from Saddam; how the invasion of Iraq was dreamed up by the Bush team long before they took over the White House; and how the US and UK tried to destroy whistleblowers who attempted to expose the lies of the two administrations. You can?t miss this book ? and here?s why: in August 1999, Mackay revealed after briefings with his intelligence contacts in the CIA that the al-Qaeda network was planning to attack the US with planes. Make sure you read The War on Truth ? your sense of reality depends on it.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/War-Truth-Neil-Mackay/dp/1904684157/sr=8-1/qid=1168259420/ref=pd_ka_1/202-4606634-9407804?ie=UTF8&s=books"

"Re: The War on Truth by Neil Mackay -- the best book I've read since Gaurdians of Power
Posted by The Editors on January 8, 2007, 1:36 pm, in reply to "The War on Truth by Neil Mackay -- the best book I've read since Gaurdians of Power"
User logged in as: Editor

Thanks - good idea to plug the book. I started reading it at the weekend as it happens. It's thoroughly researched and seems pretty comprehensive so far (but why no index or proper referenced notes?!).
I have to say, though, that the swaggering sarcasm can be a tad offputting. Why do so many journalists think such a macho style is attractive? Maybe he's trying too hard to emulate Greg Palast, telling his readers at one point: "Oooh... you oughta see what I found, baby". And there's no need for the ad hominem stuff and cheap gibes, e.g. describing one Tory as "a buck-toothed geek of a minister who anyone would have picked on at school" and another as "a big, fat, chinless liar."

Still, if you can get past all the vitriol and sarcasm, the book is packed with vital info - even if you think you already know what there is to know (you probably don't) - and it is well worth getting hold of.

DC"
Tue Jan 09, 2007 12:31 pm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
toastkid



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 393

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

Pasted from the message board.

Posted by Chris Roberts on February 16, 2007, 12:29 am

Has anyone read "The Structural Transformation of The Public Sphere" by Habermas? Question Time fulfills the bourgeois ideal(s) of public sphere and democracy with perfection. It's the best example on British TV of discourse in action.
Fri Feb 16, 2007 8:51 am
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
toastkid



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 393

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

Copied from the message board.

"Genocide, Bosnia and the ICTY

Posted by lenin on February 27, 2007, 12:49 am

In which I "downplay Serbian atrocities"...


*****************************

Re: Genocide, Bosnia and the ICTY

Posted by Neil on February 27, 2007, 9:44 am, in reply to "Genocide, Bosnia and the ICTY"


Excellent commentary! Can you recommend some texts that provide good background to the wars in Yugoslavia?

So basically Chomsky and Herman are correct?

Many Thanks,
Neil

*************************************

Re: Genocide, Bosnia and the ICTY

Posted by lenin on February 27, 2007, 10:50 am, in reply to "Re: Genocide, Bosnia and the ICTY"


Well, someone in my comments boxes points to some errors in Herman's approach, but I think it's basically sound.

On texts, I would suggest the following: Susan Woodward's Balkan Tragedy; Diana Johnstone's Fool's Crusade (disagree with some of the books's approach, but it has some useful analysis); Kate Hudson's South Slav Dream: The Rise and Fall of Yugoslavia; Tariq Ali (ed), Masters of the Universe?: Nato's Balkan Crusade; Lindsey German (ed), The Balkans: Nationalism and Imperialism; Branka Magas, The Destruction of Yugoslavia (tragically, Magas was won over by Croatian nationalism in the early 1990s and the last essays in the book are marred by that).

This piece by Peter Gowan is also interesting:

http://labourfocus.gn.apc.org/Twisted.html"
Tue Feb 27, 2007 5:43 pm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
toastkid



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 393

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

Posted by JK on May 22, 2007, 2:04 pm, in reply to "Out-of-date food in UK supermarkets"

"Couple of pertinent books worth reading

'Shopped: The Shocking Power of British Supermarkets'
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Shopped-Shocking-Power-British-Supermarkets/dp/0007158041

'Tescopoly: How One Shop Came Out on Top and Why It Matters'
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Tescopoly-How-Shop-Came-Matters/dp/1845295110/ref=pd_bowtega_1/202-8091473-0259043?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1179838985&sr=1-1 "
Tue May 22, 2007 2:53 pm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
toastkid



Joined: 30 Jul 2005
Posts: 393

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

Just read "The Art of Loving" by Erich Fromm

Short and easy enough to read.

His hypothesis is that love of others, ourselves and our partners is an art which has been neglected and even actively destroyed by modern society overwhelmingly ordered by capital. So he has some interesting insights into how we fail and even guidance on practice of the art of love.
Tue May 29, 2007 1:07 am
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Media Lens Forum Index -> Video, News, Books, Websites All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
Page 1 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2005 phpBB Group
    printer friendly
eXTReMe Tracker