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sir jay de mellow



Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 524

Post Post subject: tory! tory! tory! Reply with quote

some questions about the pending uk tory leadership race

which tory contender is the blankest canvass

on which tory candidate can the media build a cultural wave - and where may that lead

which one will be presented in the most image laden way

anybody knowhow the famous focus group on newsnight the other week worked

saw an article from a couple of years ago in a uk broadsheet, full page, framing two up and coming tories as the new bill and ben [tony and gordon], new generation. - cant find it can someone post

in relation to the following link [ brilliant article posted on the board/forum by a m/lenser previously]

http://politics.guardian.co.uk/whitehall/story/0,9061,1505868,00.html

what are the business links of the 4 candidates

merkel etc... any international implications wrt political culture change

all the best , sir jay
Fri Oct 14, 2005 9:44 am
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sir jay de mellow



Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 524

Post Post subject: full article quoted in post, from board in case it falls off Reply with quote

this is the full article posted originally on the mlens board and quoted in the post above. am putting here in full incase it falls off the board, the link thus becoming redundant.

Brothers who sit at Blair's right hand

How McKinsey, the secretive global consultancy firm, is gaining influence at the heart of UK plc

Sandra Laville and Nils Pratley
Tuesday June 14, 2005
The Guardian


The following correction was printed in the Guardian's Corrections and clarifications column, Saturday June 18 2005

We may have given the impression in the article below that Lord Birt was trained by McKinsey. He was not. He is a paid adviser to the company on global media and entertainment practices.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Variously described as the Brotherhood, the Firm, or the Jesuits of capitalism, the global consultancy firm McKinsey likes to maintain an aura of secrecy around its work. It never advertises for clients and through a close network of alumni across the international business world it has developed an elite and loyal following who endorse the need to keep the secrets of success within the extended family.


Article continues

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

With McKinsey consultants right at the heart of government, however, questions about the company's philosophy, cost-effectiveness and level of influence on policy are increasingly being asked.
Yesterday the Guardian revealed that David Bennett, a former partner at McKinsey, who has been hired by Tony Blair to head Downing Street's policy unit, will have a key role in deciding the appointment of the new £220,000-a-year cabinet secretary. Mr Bennett is one of a number of McKinsey-trained people already advising the government: Lord Birt, Nick Lovegrove and Adair Turner, who now heads the commission into the future of pensions, to name a few. The firm has landed contracts worth tens of millions of pounds as Mr Blair increasingly turns to private-sector consultants to drive through change in Whitehall.

Lord Hanningfield, the Conservative peer, is still waiting for answers to questions he tabled a month ago about McKinsey's influence on the government. He asked how many civil servants from Downing Street are on secondment to McKinsey, and vice versa, as well as what government contracts the company holds and how much they are worth. The answers were expected a fortnight ago, but the Cabinet Office said yesterday that they had still not been completed. Asked when they were likely to be ready, a spokesman said: "I am sorry, I don't know."

What the answers will not address is the innate loyalty to the McKinsey brand held by all those who leave to work outside the plush offices in Jermyn Street, London, and venture into the upper echelons of Whitehall. All were brought up on the McKinsey philosophy: "Everything can be measured and what gets measured gets managed."

Within the firm hours are long, expectations high and failure not acceptable. "Nothing is ever done for the sake of enjoyment, there is a purpose to everything," said one former McKinseyite. "There is a policy of up or out. If you don't get promoted every year or two you are out. They just tell you you are not getting anywhere."

"Working at McKinsey is a combination of being cossetted and terribly stressed," said Eileen Shapiro, a former McKinsey consultant. "It is a very plush environment but it is also extremely stressful because it is very long hours and a very intense kind of environment."

Ms Shapiro, however, questions whether McKinseyites have the capability to carry through the kind of radical policy change that Tony Blair is calling for. "As consultants you are not accountable," she said. "You advise on the bets but you don't place the bets. Some consultants who shift out of consultancy into a position where they actually make the bets make that transition fabulously, others don't because they don't understand the difference between advising and acting."

McKinsey's blue-chip reputation was shaken in the 1990s when its involvement with Enron, the energy company that collapsed in scandal and accounting irregularities, was revealed in detail.

Enron was regarded as the house that McKinsey built. The consultants were being paid $10m a year for their advice; the company was run by Jeffrey Skilling, a former McKinsey partner; and the in-house journal the McKinsey Quarterly regularly lauded Enron as an exemplar of its philosophy of "creative destruction".

Though McKinsey survived Enron's collapse, it prompted a return to a more conservative style under Ian Davis, who became the first Briton to lead the firm in July 2003.

The new McKinseyites increasingly see sitting at the right hand of the prime minister as their rightful place.

Alumni speak the same tongue, one that is very different from Whitehall's. "Language gets mangled within McKinsey. They never speak about 'a project'; it's always 'a study'," the former employee said. "McKinsey itself is always 'the Firm' with a capital F and the job titles are really modelled on those of a legal partnership."

In the 90s McKinsey recruited the brightest graduates from Oxford University and Harvard Business School. But however clever you are, there is a more important condition of employment. "The question they always ask is 'do they fit?'," said the former employee. "It's not good enough just to be clever; you have to fit."

A brief history

· James 'Mac' McKinsey founded firm in 1926, quitting as professor of accounting at Chicago University

· McKinsey's boast was that its 'management engineers' could not only help ailing companies but show healthy ones how to grow

· As part of globalisation in the 1990s, McKinsey helped privatise services in former East Germany

· Today it employs more than 6,000 consultants in 80 locations around the world

Source: McKinsey & Co

all the best, sir jay
Fri Oct 21, 2005 2:20 am
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sir jay de mellow



Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 524

Post Post subject: Reply with quote

ok ok im learning about computer language. Embarassed wrt second post[ i put the guardian link, which obviously wont fall off] Embarassed






with reference to the media representation of the leadership contest since the conference speeches up until today late 20/10/5 , the day the final two candidates were chosen. i have never in all my life seen such coverage, clearly promoting one outcome. it is my belief that this period of times coverage , certainly on uk terrestrial tv papers and radio, would present a future text book case for "set piece" media analysis for years to come as it , imho has used both classic and subtle nuanced techniques to present.



all the best,sir jay
Fri Oct 21, 2005 2:31 am
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sir jay de mellow



Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 524

Post Post subject: incidently Reply with quote

incidently im looking for other signs wrt cultural wave

whether in subject of argument
whether in style/ emphasis of argument
whether in fashion
whether in music

cos it looks like the late 70s/early 80s and themes associated with them are being promoted/pushed

been happening for a couple of years as far as i can see

anything relevent please post
Sun Oct 23, 2005 11:49 pm
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sir jay de mellow



Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 524

Post Post subject: at last! - some substance- from the guardian Reply with quote

http://www.guardian.co.uk/comment/story/0,3604,1598988,00.html

Comment

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Cameron is no moderate

He supports the Iraq war and tax cuts, opposes EU social policies and has neocon associations

Neil Clark
Monday October 24, 2005
The Guardian


What exactly is moderate about David Cameron? On taxation, the Tory leadership favourite has signalled his attraction to the flat-rate tax, a far-right wheeze that would leave, according to a Treasury report, up to 30 million Britons worse off and the super-rich even richer. Declaring his support for "flatter taxes", Cameron has enthusiastically backed the decision of his lieutenant, George Osborne, to set up a commission to investigate the idea and has signed up to a classic Thatcherite economic agenda of tax cuts and deregulation.

Article continues

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On Europe, he wants the Conservatives to break their long-standing link with centre-right Christian Democrat parties in the European parliament and talks of "fighting to end the EU's damaging social role". And in foreign policy, he is an unreconstructed hawk, his campaign masterminded by the neoconservative trio of Tory MPs Osborne, Michael Gove and Ed Vaizey, all enthusiastic cheerleaders for Pax Americana. Osborne hailed the "excellent neoconservative case" for action against Iraq in 2003 and denies that the invasion has radicalised Muslim opinion.
Gove and Vaizey are signatories to the statement of principles of the Henry Jackson Society, which has its UK launch next month. The society - named after the US Democratic senator who opposed detente with the Soviet Union - campaigns for a "forward strategy" to spread "liberal democracy across the world" through "the full spectrum of 'carrot' capacities, be they diplomatic, economic, cultural or political, but also, when necessary, those 'sticks' of the military domain". Calling for the "maintenance of a strong military with a global expeditionary reach", the society bemoans the fact that "too few of our leaders in Britain and Europe are ready to play a role in the world that matches our strengths and responsibilities".

The list of Henry Jackson patrons reads like a Who's Who of US foreign-policy hawks: including the former CIA director James Wolsey, William Kristol, editor of the Weekly Standard, and Richard Perle, former chairman of the Defence Policy Board and the man many see as the architect of the Iraq war.

Cameron himself voted for the Iraq war, believing that to vote no "would have been to break the US-UK alliance which has been the cornerstone of our peace and security". Saddam, according to the new Tory saviour, posed a threat not just to the Middle East region, but "to the world", and like all good neocons Cameron blamed the conflict on the French and their promise to veto any second UN security council resolution.

Cameron's meteoric rise from leadership no-hoper to frontrunner has taken many by surprise. But what has happened is that British neoconservatives, faced with the nightmarish possibility that in a straight fight between David Davis and Kenneth Clarke the more charismatic and anti-war former chancellor would prevail, sought to undermine support for the latter by reinventing Cameron, the pro-war Thatcherite, as the voice of Tory "moderation".

The strategy has worked. "The central job of a new Tory leader is to put the Conservative argument in a different way ... to be the change, not just to talk about it. Putting policy meat on the bones just isn't the point" - these are the views of the Tories' modernising guru Daniel Finkelstein. For him, the fact that Cameron looks moderate is all that matters. But those not enamoured by the prospect of a regressive tax system, a revival of 1980s economics, a hostile attitude to Europe or British participation in military invasions of Iran, Syria or any other country the US decides to attack in five or six years' time are well advised to read the small print.

neilclark6@hotmail.com

www.neilclark66.blogspot.com
Mon Oct 24, 2005 5:24 am
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sir jay de mellow



Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 524

Post Post subject: re cultural wave world connections Reply with quote

re cultural wave world connections

from first post :

Quote:
merkel etc... any international implications wrt political culture change



Merkel promises to transform Germany's relationship with US

· Next chancellor plans to loosen ties with France
· Foreign ministry in SPD hands may limit changes

Luke Harding in Berlin
Monday October 31, 2005
The Guardian


Germany's chancellor designate, Angela Merkel, yesterday signalled a new era for the country's foreign policy, including a "fresh start" with the US and looser ties with Paris and Moscow.
Mrs Merkel intends to repair relations with Washington after the row between her predecessor, Gerhard Schröder, and George Bush over Iraq, her aides said over the weekend. She also promised a transformation in Germany's relationship with its two closest allies, Russia and France.

Mrs Merkel wants "more distance" with Moscow and a looser, less exclusive alliance with France's president, Jacques Chirac, officials from her Christian Democratic party told the magazine Der Spiegel. She also wants to improve relations with the new EU states in eastern Europe, especially Poland, they added.
Mrs Merkel's aides also held out the prospect of Germany playing a "moderating" role in Europe - able to adjudicate between competing national interests within a vastly expanded EU. "The transformation will be subtle, but carried out with the full authority of the chancellor," a senior Merkel official said.

There was no mention of Britain. But Mrs Merkel's apparent determination to draw a line under the Schröder era is likely to delight Downing Street, which is trying to broker a deal over the EU budget. The issue provoked a furious row in June between Tony Blair and Mr Chirac. Mr Schröder, Mr Chirac's closest ally, criticised Britain's refusal to compromise on its rebate, and last week dismissed Mr Blair's attempts to reform the EU as irrelevant. The prime minister had hoped that Mrs Merkel would attend last week's EU summit at Hampton Court. Instead, after Germany's deadlocked election, Mr Schröder came in her place, ridiculing Mr Blair's attempts to introduce "Anglo-Saxon" economics to the rest of Europe.

Leading politicians from Mr Schröder's Social Democrats yesterday cast doubt on Mrs Merkel's ability to transform German foreign policy when she takes office next month. Coalition negotiations between Mrs Merkel's party and the SPD are continuing, with Mrs Merkel likely to be formally appointed chancellor after a vote in parliament on November 22.

However, the Social Democrats will hold on to the post of foreign minister. They have nominated Frank-Walter Steinmeier - a lawyer and confidant of Mr Schröder whose command of English is inferior to that of his predecessor, the dazzling Joschka Fischer. Although Mrs Merkel would be able to set "accents" in foreign policy, the "main thrust" would come from the SPD, the party's deputy leader, Gernot Erler, said at the weekend.

Yesterday, meanwhile, Mr Schröder admitted that he was considering leaving politics early rather than spending the next four years as a backbencher. He did not intend to hang around like his predecessor Helmut Kohl, he said, who stayed in parliament after losing power in 1998
Mon Oct 31, 2005 6:59 am
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sir jay de mellow



Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 524

Post Post subject: note well Reply with quote

wrt "eighties remix" analogy and cultural change

note also polands new pm/pres
likely outcomes in france - post riot and later in the month strikes
bear in mind change in germany and previous rift in nato and nominally western powers pre irq latest war
Wed Nov 09, 2005 7:07 am
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sir jay de mellow



Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 524

Post Post subject: some strategy? Reply with quote

some strategy?


watch for "emblematic replacement"

ie: what a vaguely pro labour non politico non alt media subscriber would identify as identifiers/emblematic of labour rhetoric, association, policy strength, potential real legacy, and future rose tinted remembranceand reputation.

off the top of my head: for example

--education education education,
--labour as custodian of national health service - health,
--"not a time for soundbites.....i feel the hand of history".
...... northern ireland peace process
--im not sure on the economy but the signal may have been the imf criticism in 2004?[trad hard tory territory]
--africa??? agenda
--








some of these are "labour strong" and thus will have a different approach in delinking/replacement than "labour soft" areas that are more associated with the blair premiership and take over of middle ground.

iraq is a tricky one, for the tories, and will no doubt require a proxy approach

note also media emotivations to characterise blair - recently ive heard "stalinist" from a consult-correspondent on the bbc to describe a speech of his. - linking into crit of regulations [ any surviving] in "reforms" esp in "hard labour" territory such as health again leading into a changed european approach a] red tape b].........which is less emphasised

then theres the individual libertarian theme intertwined with a more libertarian business approach - .... again less emphasised[ maybe because less real change]

?

some of this has international relevence wrt eg political conditions in europe etc and some linked less obviously

all the best,f
Sun Jan 01, 2006 5:08 am
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sir jay de mellow



Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 524

Post Post subject: leadership and the anti war movement Reply with quote

liberal leadership and the anti war movement


not exactly on the topic but

of the three remaining liberal leadership contenders:

do they have different views on the iraq war?

and what are the differences?

will it have any importance/relavence to the anti war movement?

will it have any importance/relavence to the broader political landscape in the uk

...
...
...
...


unrelatedly,

i reckon chris hune will get it.

all the best, sir jay
Wed Feb 01, 2006 6:02 pm
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sir jay de mellow



Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 524

Post Post subject: on generational loopback Reply with quote

re the generational loopback/cohort management
[see previous intuitions in above thread]

im only quoting this bit of the article:

Quote:

In other words, Labour has a missing generation. Most junior ministers in their 40s are not well-regarded or well-known. Labour's rising stars - Ed Balls, David Lammy, Ed Miliband, Yvette Cooper, James Purnell, for example - are all in their 30s. There is a good reason for this. The formative years for political commitment are those spent at university. Anybody now in their 40s would have attended university in the late 1970s or early 1980s when Labour seemed tired and discredited and all the vitality, modernity and fresh thinking came from the right. It was simply not a good time to be Labour, just as the 1960s, when most of the present cabinet went to university, was not a good time to be Conservative.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/story/0,,1859710,00.html


.....as food for thought

all the best, sir jay
Mon Aug 28, 2006 4:26 am
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sir jay de mellow



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Post Post subject: bit more on luntz cameron coulson hunt coalition news intern Reply with quote

bit more on luntz cameron (coulson hunt...etc ) coalition news international uk elections

sir jay de mellow wrote:


with reference to the media representation of the leadership contest since the conference speeches up until today late 20/10/5 , the day the final two candidates were chosen, i have never in all my life seen such coverage, clearly promoting one outcome. it is my belief that this period of times coverage , certainly on uk terrestrial tv papers and radio, would present a future text book case for "set piece" media analysis for years to come as it , imho has used both classic and subtle nuanced techniques to present. sjdm


Quote:
anybody know how the famous focus group on newsnight the other week worked sjdm


ok so this was 2005, it was the conservative leadership race, pinky-ring hadnt yet fully unsheathed what a passive man could do to the poor people of britain, the nation had a welfare state, an nhs etc.

the particular set-piece insertion of blatant, outrageous partisan candidate coverage/leader creation comes on a newsnight segment.

step forward mr frank luntz:

wiki sez:
Quote:
In 2005 Luntz conducted a focus group broadcast on the Conservative leadership race on the BBC current affairs show Newsnight. The focus group's overwhelmingly positive reaction to David Cameron was seen by many as crucial in making him the favorite in a crowded field. Cameron was the eventual victor


then onto oz

Quote:
2007 Australian federal election

Another focus group of swing voters was analysed by Luntz in the lead-up to the November 2007 poll between the ruling Coalition and the opposition Labor party. Luntz noted that, like the Irish scenario, the Coalition was well established, presiding over the country for 11 years and overseeing continued economic growth for much of that period; and that unlike the lead-up to the Irish elections, Australia had a stronger and more popular opposition leader in Kevin Rudd: "This is much closer to the Irish election where the leader just barely scraped in, Bertie Ahern, because the economy was so good. But the big difference there was the opposition leader was not as good as Kevin Rudd." Luntz was brought in to conduct his research in a collaborative effort by Sky News Australia and The Australian newspaper.[15]
is that for ni and ni?

on the australian, wiki sez:
Quote:
The Australian is published by News Limited, an asset of News Corporation, which also owns the sole dailies in Brisbane, Adelaide, Hobart and Darwin and the most popular metropolitan dailies in Sydney and Melbourne.[2] News Corporation's Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and Founder is Rupert Murdoch.
The Australian integrates content from overseas newspapers owned by News Limited's parent, News Corporation, including the Wall Street Journal and The Times.[2]


back to uk another saturation feedback loop

uk gen elect debate
Quote:
During the 2010 UK General Election, Luntz led focus groups during the Prime Ministerial debates between Gordon Brown, David Cameron and Nick Clegg, and wrote about his findings for The Sun,[16] and also appeared on the BBCs Daily Politics.

ni and tory/ex ni title editor/bbc?

andrew neil wiki sez:
Quote:
before working for the Conservative Party as a research assistant and then joined The Economist as a correspondent in 1973, and was later promoted to being the editor of the publication's section on Britain. .... Neil made his name at The Sunday Times where he was editor for 11 years....Neil was editor of The Sunday Times from 1983 until 1994. His hiring was controversial. It was argued that he was appointed by Rupert Murdoch over more experienced colleagues, like Hugo Young and Brian MacArthur.[9]In 1988 he also became founding chairman of Sky TV


back to luntz

Quote:
His most recent work has been with the Fox News Channel as a frequent commentator and analyst


en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Luntz

good info here:


http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Frank_Luntz



all the best, sir jay
Wed May 02, 2012 4:48 am
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